Backyard Fire Pit

Backyard Fire Pit

Next Up How to Create a Sugar-Kettle Fire Feature Fire bowls don’t have to be ordinary. Add height and interest to your yard by using an authentic cast-iron sugar kettle as the fire bowl for a raised-stone fire pit. How to Build a Fire Pit and Grill Learn how to create an outdoor fire pit and grill with a flagstone seating area. How to Create a Fieldstone and Sand Fire Pit Area Bring the beach to your backyard with a sand and stone fire pit. How to Build a Stone Fire Pit Heat up your backyard with the addition of a stone fire pit. How To Build a Round Stone Fire Pit Although tougher to construct than a standard square or rectangular fire pit, a round shape blends better with the organic, curvilinear forms of the surrounding landscape. How to Prepare for a Fire Pit The key to headache-free work is organization. Begin a fire pit project by organizing a tool area and an area for mixing concrete and mortar. How to Set Stones for a Fire Pit Learn how to put together the stones for a fire pit. How to Set Capstones for a Fire Pit Learn how to put the finishing touches on a fire pit with capstones and a seating area. How to Hook Up the Gas for a Fire Pit By taking the following steps, you can safely hook up the gas burners on the raised fire pit. How to Build a Backyard Water Feature Learn how to build a water feature that adds interest to a backyard.
backyard fire pit 1

Backyard Fire Pit

How to Create a Sugar-Kettle Fire Feature Fire bowls don’t have to be ordinary. Add height and interest to your yard by using an authentic cast-iron sugar kettle as the fire bowl for a raised-stone fire pit. How to Build a Fire Pit and Grill Learn how to create an outdoor fire pit and grill with a flagstone seating area. How to Create a Fieldstone and Sand Fire Pit Area Bring the beach to your backyard with a sand and stone fire pit. How to Build a Stone Fire Pit Heat up your backyard with the addition of a stone fire pit. How To Build a Round Stone Fire Pit Although tougher to construct than a standard square or rectangular fire pit, a round shape blends better with the organic, curvilinear forms of the surrounding landscape. How to Prepare for a Fire Pit The key to headache-free work is organization. Begin a fire pit project by organizing a tool area and an area for mixing concrete and mortar. How to Set Stones for a Fire Pit Learn how to put together the stones for a fire pit. How to Set Capstones for a Fire Pit Learn how to put the finishing touches on a fire pit with capstones and a seating area. How to Hook Up the Gas for a Fire Pit By taking the following steps, you can safely hook up the gas burners on the raised fire pit. How to Build a Backyard Water Feature Learn how to build a water feature that adds interest to a backyard.
backyard fire pit 2

Backyard Fire Pit

Introduction Plan Your Fire Pit Design Backyard fire pits are one of the most popular of all landscaping features. They are attractive, functional and provide an outdoor gathering place. Ideally, a fire pit is constructed from fireproof material on a flat, level area at least 25 feet from a house or tree. Fire pits are strictly governed by local building codes. Some codes require the pit to be encircled by a border of sand or gravel. So before you decide to add one to your backyard, know the code in your area. The style and shape of a fire pit can vary. Our circular fire pit is about 2′ tall x 5′ total diameter and a 3′ interior diameter.
backyard fire pit 3

Backyard Fire Pit

Plan Your Fire Pit Design Backyard fire pits are one of the most popular of all landscaping features. They are attractive, functional and provide an outdoor gathering place. Ideally, a fire pit is constructed from fireproof material on a flat, level area at least 25 feet from a house or tree. Fire pits are strictly governed by local building codes. Some codes require the pit to be encircled by a border of sand or gravel. So before you decide to add one to your backyard, know the code in your area. The style and shape of a fire pit can vary. Our circular fire pit is about 2′ tall x 5′ total diameter and a 3′ interior diameter.
backyard fire pit 4

Backyard Fire Pit

Lajos Geenen Author Copy Created with Sketch. By George Retseck Mar 17, 2017 My wife and I love lighting a big fire in the backyard to cap off a day of entertaining. But building a pyre on the lawn left an ugly charred circle that grew larger over time. It made me cringe the next morning; it was like a visual hangover. We also worried that a wind-blown ember could torch the nearby woods.I considered building a traditional brick fire pit on a concrete footing, but that’s no small undertaking or expense. The first step would be to dig a 30-inch-deep footing trench down through rocky soil. Then I’d have to get the concrete into the trench. Even if I opted to get the material delivered, it’s not easy lugging it by wheelbarrow. Mixing it by hand also seemed like a backbreaker. So I abandoned the idea of traditional masonry. Investigating chimineas and steel fire rings at a nearby home center, my wife and I discovered the Fossil Stone Fire Pit from Natural Concrete Products, a $500 kit of concrete blocks and a steel fire ring.Much to my surprise, a buddy and I constructed the pit in 4 hours. When night fell, I kindled a big fire. Friends gathered, and I relaxed with a cold beer. The pit looked great and safely contained the fire without a burnt ring of grass the next day.Advertisement – Continue Reading Below
backyard fire pit 5

Backyard Fire Pit

Lajos Geenen Author Copy Created with Sketch. By George Retseck Mar 17, 2017 My wife and I love lighting a big fire in the backyard to cap off a day of entertaining. But building a pyre on the lawn left an ugly charred circle that grew larger over time. It made me cringe the next morning; it was like a visual hangover. We also worried that a wind-blown ember could torch the nearby woods.I considered building a traditional brick fire pit on a concrete footing, but that’s no small undertaking or expense. The first step would be to dig a 30-inch-deep footing trench down through rocky soil. Then I’d have to get the concrete into the trench. Even if I opted to get the material delivered, it’s not easy lugging it by wheelbarrow. Mixing it by hand also seemed like a backbreaker. So I abandoned the idea of traditional masonry. Investigating chimineas and steel fire rings at a nearby home center, my wife and I discovered the Fossil Stone Fire Pit from Natural Concrete Products, a $500 kit of concrete blocks and a steel fire ring.Much to my surprise, a buddy and I constructed the pit in 4 hours. When night fell, I kindled a big fire. Friends gathered, and I relaxed with a cold beer. The pit looked great and safely contained the fire without a burnt ring of grass the next day.
backyard fire pit 6

Backyard Fire Pit

My wife and I love lighting a big fire in the backyard to cap off a day of entertaining. But building a pyre on the lawn left an ugly charred circle that grew larger over time. It made me cringe the next morning; it was like a visual hangover. We also worried that a wind-blown ember could torch the nearby woods.I considered building a traditional brick fire pit on a concrete footing, but that’s no small undertaking or expense. The first step would be to dig a 30-inch-deep footing trench down through rocky soil. Then I’d have to get the concrete into the trench. Even if I opted to get the material delivered, it’s not easy lugging it by wheelbarrow. Mixing it by hand also seemed like a backbreaker. So I abandoned the idea of traditional masonry. Investigating chimineas and steel fire rings at a nearby home center, my wife and I discovered the Fossil Stone Fire Pit from Natural Concrete Products, a $500 kit of concrete blocks and a steel fire ring.Much to my surprise, a buddy and I constructed the pit in 4 hours. When night fell, I kindled a big fire. Friends gathered, and I relaxed with a cold beer. The pit looked great and safely contained the fire without a burnt ring of grass the next day.
backyard fire pit 7

Backyard Fire Pit

Prepare a Site Here’s what not to do: Build the pit under low-hanging limbs or power lines. Also, avoid putting it over or near a septic tank, leaching field, well head, or property line. Local laws will almost certainly require you to position a structure of this type a given distance from your neighbor’s plot, not to mention your own house. Check the codes at the town hall or the fire department.After my buddy—Roy Berendsohn, Popular Mechanics’ senior home editor—and I had located the ideal spot in my yard, we drove a stake at the approximate center of the pit, looped a mason’s line around the stake, and then tied the line around a can of white landscape spray paint, with which I created a 102-inch-diameter circle. This is large enough to accommodate the pit, whose outside diameter is 66 inches, and a surrounding 18-inch band of River Jacks gravel.To create a base for the pit and gravel, we dug a hole 4 inches deep bordered by the painted circle and dumped in enough crushed stone to fill a few wheelbarrows. (I used 2A Modified, a common road-building material in my area; check for something similar at your local stone yard.) After raking the stone to a depth of about 2 inches, we compacted it with a hand tamper.For aesthetic reasons and to ensure the fire-pit blocks align properly, it’s important to build the pit’s walls on a level surface. So we marked a 68-inch-diameter circle (a couple inches wider than the outer wall of the pit) on the compacted stone, then used a 4-foot mason’s level to check the surface. We weren’t as fussy about leveling the rest of the stone, since it would be covered just by the gravel. George Retseck

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