Sealing Basement Walls

Sealing Basement Walls

0 82 CSR / Published in BASEMENT WATERPROOFING SEALER REVIEWS, BASEMENTS Basement Waterproofing Sealers Review Basements are known for water, moisture, mold and mildew problems. Since basement foundations are underground they are usually in close proximity to the water table. This creates a problem since water tends to mitigate towards the walls of the basement; especially during rainy seasons and during springs inevitable snow melting. There are many companies out there that offer basement waterproofing solutions but only a handful that truly live up to their claims. Over the years we have found the best way to prevent basement moisture and water damage is early prevention. By sealing a homes foundation when it is first poured is the best kept secrete when it comes to basement waterproofing. When looking for a sealer look for a penetrating, waterproofing sealer. Acrylics, epoxies and urethanes will all peel up and will not adhere at the first sign of water. Silicates alone are marketed as waterproofers but do not effectively complete the job. Silicates are known densifiers; however if the sealer is a silicate/siliconate blend you are in luck since the smaller silicate molecule will densify and the larger siliconate molecule will chemically react and waterproof your basement. Silane/Siloxane sealers are excellent choices for basement concrete block and/or cinderblock walls. They are really the only effective solutions for waterproofing basement concrete block and cinderblock walls. And whatever you do, despite their claims, do not use DryLok to waterproof your basement. You will have numerous and countless adhesion problems since DryLok is latex based. Our Take: Some excellent products on the market include Okon’s S-40, Diamond Hard and Lithi-Tek LS 9500
sealing basement walls 1

Sealing Basement Walls

Sparkle 11 months ago Subject: Wet basement; wet crawlspace; wet garage Entry to front door is one step up. 5 below grade vents are along the front of the house but not in front of the garage (concrete slab) that is entered from back of house. When facing the house, the left side has about 18″ of crawl space underneath and the right side of the house is higher (the part basement and part crawlspace side) with about 7 steps to enter the right side of the house and the same number of steps on that same side of the house at the back entrance. the garage side of the house gets lower again with 4 steps to the garage but once in the garage, only 2 steps to floor level. House built in 1950s. Parents placed a sump pump (the exterior steps to basement allows water to drain downward toward the pump despite the roofing over the steps) at the entry door and some type of dark grey concrete coating was placed halfway up on the block walls throughout the basement. All efforts worked only temporarily. Today, most of the water seems to be coming in on the opposite side to the pump and is downhill so does not reach the pump unless the entire floor is covered and then it only pumps what is in the vicinity of the pump. Also if enough water gets into the crawl space, water pours like a water fall through stair step cracks between the blocks under the crawl space door. This did not occur frequently but certainly when it rains very hard for a long period of time. After the devastating SC flood this past Oct., I seem to have to pump water every time it rains now. All of the solutions I've gotten for the problems make my head spin. Don't know what advice to follow but have replaced gutters which has made things worse in some ways. The downspouts are extended out 4 feet or so on only 2 at the front of the house and it just pools more water in those areas which can't be good. The supposed seamless gutters drip water on my head when I try to enter the house at the door on the steps. I believe that the below grade vents are a contributing factor as well as the cracks under the crawlspace door that opens to the basement, not to mention those gutters. Sometimes water seems to be coming up or draining from the sides of the sump pump hole and there is a mysterious pipe along the side of the wall that also drops water into the basement when it rains. I think perhaps a washer was once located there. There are faucets above as well. No one seems to know where that pipe leads but I know that water is getting to it and through it somehow. A few days ago (another estimate) I was shown rust stained area at the base of the walls, sort of looks like a baseboard and was told that groundwater was coming in there. There are things in the basement that have rusted as the amount of water in the basement with the pump working during the flood took some while to be pumped out. On the opposite side of the wall with the stain is crawlspace that seems to be dig out into a basin. Perhaps that was done to accept a heating duct that extends from the furnace that is also in the basement. The window side of the basement seems to have no problems at all though the bottom of the window is flush with the ground. I can't see doing exterior excavation when it seems as though it's the interior walls are involved and of course the crawlspace. My thoughts, being on a budget, would be getting the gutters to work properly, doing something with the below grade vents but is it safe to close them up since ventilation is needed, sealing the cracks under crawlspace door, doing something with that pipe and the doorway. I think all of the water (95%) comes from the two walls that touch crawlspace. I think I can deal with the garage if I can solve the other problems. Any advice or suggestions? replyto Sparkle
sealing basement walls 2

Sealing Basement Walls

Entry to front door is one step up. 5 below grade vents are along the front of the house but not in front of the garage (concrete slab) that is entered from back of house. When facing the house, the left side has about 18″ of crawl space underneath and the right side of the house is higher (the part basement and part crawlspace side) with about 7 steps to enter the right side of the house and the same number of steps on that same side of the house at the back entrance. the garage side of the house gets lower again with 4 steps to the garage but once in the garage, only 2 steps to floor level. House built in 1950s. Parents placed a sump pump (the exterior steps to basement allows water to drain downward toward the pump despite the roofing over the steps) at the entry door and some type of dark grey concrete coating was placed halfway up on the block walls throughout the basement. All efforts worked only temporarily. Today, most of the water seems to be coming in on the opposite side to the pump and is downhill so does not reach the pump unless the entire floor is covered and then it only pumps what is in the vicinity of the pump. Also if enough water gets into the crawl space, water pours like a water fall through stair step cracks between the blocks under the crawl space door. This did not occur frequently but certainly when it rains very hard for a long period of time. After the devastating SC flood this past Oct., I seem to have to pump water every time it rains now. All of the solutions I've gotten for the problems make my head spin. Don't know what advice to follow but have replaced gutters which has made things worse in some ways. The downspouts are extended out 4 feet or so on only 2 at the front of the house and it just pools more water in those areas which can't be good. The supposed seamless gutters drip water on my head when I try to enter the house at the door on the steps. I believe that the below grade vents are a contributing factor as well as the cracks under the crawlspace door that opens to the basement, not to mention those gutters. Sometimes water seems to be coming up or draining from the sides of the sump pump hole and there is a mysterious pipe along the side of the wall that also drops water into the basement when it rains. I think perhaps a washer was once located there. There are faucets above as well. No one seems to know where that pipe leads but I know that water is getting to it and through it somehow. A few days ago (another estimate) I was shown rust stained area at the base of the walls, sort of looks like a baseboard and was told that groundwater was coming in there. There are things in the basement that have rusted as the amount of water in the basement with the pump working during the flood took some while to be pumped out. On the opposite side of the wall with the stain is crawlspace that seems to be dig out into a basin. Perhaps that was done to accept a heating duct that extends from the furnace that is also in the basement. The window side of the basement seems to have no problems at all though the bottom of the window is flush with the ground. I can't see doing exterior excavation when it seems as though it's the interior walls are involved and of course the crawlspace. My thoughts, being on a budget, would be getting the gutters to work properly, doing something with the below grade vents but is it safe to close them up since ventilation is needed, sealing the cracks under crawlspace door, doing something with that pipe and the doorway. I think all of the water (95%) comes from the two walls that touch crawlspace. I think I can deal with the garage if I can solve the other problems. Any advice or suggestions?

Sealing Basement Walls

Sealing Basement Walls
Sealing Basement Walls
Sealing Basement Walls
Sealing Basement Walls

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